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CAPITAL IDEAS -- LIVE!

MAY 2013 News Conference for Forest Owners
Sponsored by the Alabama Forest Owners' Association, Inc.
This Conference was recorded on May 15, 2013

CLICK HERE
to Listen to the
Conference.
This conference is in .mp3 format, which is compatible with Windows Media Player and most other media devices.

Hayes D. Brown   Alabama Forest Owners' Association

Hayes D. Brown

starting time: (00:00)
Hear Conference

Moderator

Hayes D. Brown, attorney and forest owner, will moderate this news conference. Hayes' email address is hbrown@hayesbrown.com.

Click Here to View & Hear Prior News Conferences.

 

Dr. David Lansky

(00:27)
Hear Conference

Comment

Managing Conflict in the Family Business

David Lansky is a Principal with The Family Business Consulting Group, Inc. "A clinical psychologist and family therapist by training, David spent over 15 years as a managing partner in a clinical psychology practice, where he observed the impact that personal relationships, family dynamics, and communication obstacles can have on financial families’ business operations and planning. Today, his clients include entrepreneurs, owners of privately held firms, and financial families who want to enhance their communication, develop leaders and improve their ability to collaborate and work well together." We know that many families who own forestland have experienced problems such as disagreements on management focus or investment strategy, income sharing, and work responsibilities, so we thought you might like to meet one of the co-authors of a new book, Managing Conflict in the Family Business: Understanding Challenges at the Intersection of Family and Business.

Useful Links:

Phone: (847) 266-1000
Email: lansky@efamilybusiness.com

.

Scott P. Jones

(05:42)
Hear Conference

Comment

What is a Tax Expenditure?

Scott Jones is CEO of the Forest Landowners Association, a nationwide association based in Atlanta, Georgia. In the March-April 2013 issue of Forest Landowner magazine, Scott wrote, "We recently asked our membership the following question via email: The Joint Committee on Taxation issues a list of tax expenditures each Congress listing all expenditures that cost the government money such as the home mortgage interest deduction. The 113th list has been issued and 3 key timber tax provisions are on the list."

The 3 main forestry tax expenditures are:

  1. Sale of timber treated as capital gains
  2. Forest management cost being deducted annually
  3. Reforestation cost can be deducted, limits apply, and not capitalized

Please take the time to read what other forest landowners believe will happen if they lose these "tax expenditures."

Scott recommends a thoughtful review of the following:

Phone: 800-325-2954
Email: sjones@forestlandowners.com

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Dr. Craig D. Idso

(09:30)
Hear Conference

Comment

A Different Perspective on Carbon Dioxide

Craig Idso is Editor and Chief Contributor to the online magazine CO2 Science. We learned about his work when one of his email messages, subject line: Pear Trees in a CO2-Enriched and Warmer World, was forwarded to us by a friend. The pear trees in the study seemed to do better in a warmer and elevated CO2 environment. Then on the same day, we read in The Wall Street Journal, In Defense of Carbon Dioxide: The demonized chemical compound is a boon to plant life and has little correlation with global temperature. These two articles reminded me of a story told by a professor many years ago, before carbon dioxide was considered a pollutant. A greenhouse operator in a rural area used gasoline powered electric generators to light his greenhouses at night to improve plant growth. The generators were placed inside the greenhouses to increase CO2 concentrations and improve plant growth. We thought you should meet Dr. Idso and hear him speculate on the effects global warming and elevated carbon dioxide levels might have on Alabama forests.

Background Reading: The Heretics: Dr. Craig Idso - by Rich Trzupek 

Phone: (480) 664-4923
Email: craigidso@energy-facts.org

.

John W. O'Reilly

(12:52)
Hear Conference

Comment

Telling Our Story -- A Minnesota Perspective

John O'Reilly is a Minnesota Forest Owner and an Innkeeper at Woodland Trails B & B in Hinckley, Minnesota. John is also President of the Minnesota Forestry Association, and in that role he has developed, with support from the Blandin Foundation, two 30 second Public Service Announcements that tout "the contributions private woodlands make to Minnesota's overall forest economy." The PSAs were designed to be played on Minnesota radio stations and are distributed to local radio stations by MFA members, thus introducing forest owners to radio station employees all over the state. Great idea!

Phone: (320) 655-3901
Email: president@minnesotaforestry.org

.

Dr. Theodor D. Leininger

(15:10)
Hear Conference

Comment

Cottonwood Nurse Trees Improve Quality of Planted Oaks

Ted Leininger is a Research Plant Pathologist and Project Leader at the USDA Forest Service Center for Bottomland Hardwood Research. About a year ago in Minority Landowner, Spring 2012, we read that the Center for Bottomland Hardwood Research had "developed the technique of interplanting cottonwoods with other hardwoods such as Nuttall oak. The method quickly creates a forest environment in which slower growing hardwoods can develop straighter, less branchy stems while sheltered by fast growing cottonwoods." Then, last fall, we read in Forest Landowner, Nov-Dec 2012 (sidebar, pages 7 and 8), “This regimen quickly creates a forest environment in which slower growing hardwoods can develop straighter, less branchy stems while sheltered by fast growing cottonwoods. The rapidly growing, denser forest enhances wildlife habitat, improves water quality…” In personal correspondence to AFOA, Ted wrote:

"This method involves using the silvical characteristics of cottonwoods and oaks to a managers advantage. Eastern cottonwood is what is known as a pioneer species that grows rapidly on newly-created soils such as at the edges of streams, rivers, and lakes. On the best sites, Eastern cottonwood can grow 12 or 15 feet per year initially. Oaks develop more slowly and later on in the succession of species that eventually define a mature bottomland forest on a given site. By planting the two species together in alternating rows in a tic-tac-toe design, with the oaks on a 12 x 12 foot spacing and the cottonwoods on a 12 x 12 foot spacing, conditions are established to encourage rapid forest growth along with the development of oaks with the potential for high-quality saw log production. While the Eastern cottonwoods quickly 'take' the site due to their rapid growth characteristic producing what we sometimes call an 'instant forest', the oaks have sufficient light under the developing canopy of narrow-crowned cottonwoods to produce tall, straight stems suitable for saw log production. Now when a landowner or manager looks out at a field afforested just a few years earlier, he or she sees a new forest in which the Eastern cottonwoods are 40 to 60 feet in height and the red oaks are 15 to 20 feet tall. This silvicultural system allows for two, or more, pulpwood harvests of cottonwoods and a final harvest of red oak timber in the span of 60 or more years."

Additional Supporting Material:

Phone: (662) 686-3178
Email: tleininger@fs.fed.us

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Lewis S. Dean

(19:42)
Hear Conference

Comment

Lesser Known Mineral Resources of Alabama

Lewis Dean is a Geologist at the Geological Survey of Alabama. Lewis was referred to AFOA by Dr. Charles Haynes in an email exchange in which we were trying to learn more about the less well-known mineral resources found in Alabama. Charles wrote:

"I suggest that all landowners who are not experts in east Alabama metamorphic geology, once they have had a contact for leasing their mineral rights (or surface rights in some situations), to call Lewis Dean at the Geological Survey of Alabama and explain their situation. Lewis is an expert on Alabama metamorphic geology and can help them sort out their offer and if needed, refer them to a consultant that can assist them in the particulars. ... Leasing conditions vary with mineral types, prices, and difficulty of extraction, so there’s a lot of unknowns that must be addressed and the landowner shouldn’t attempt to do this themselves. In particular, they shouldn’t try using coal or oil/gas lease terms in these rare-mineral provinces."

AFOA called Lewis and asked him to tell us a story or two about some of our mineral resources. He said he would try, but perhaps we would find reading Minerals in the Economy of Alabama, 2007 a more enjoyable experience. Lewis is the author. The file may take a few minutes to download, but we think you will find it worth the time. Be sure to review the table of contents on page 7.

Phone: (205) 247-3548
Email: ldean@gsa.state.al.us

.

Wesley Smith

(23:05)
Hear Conference

Comment

Equipment For Rent

Wes Smith is District Sales Manager at United Rentals, Inc. He sent us a note a week or two ago, suggesting that forest landowners might need equipment to work on their land. He further suggested that renting equipment for a week could prove to be more economical than owning it for a lifetime. Wes pointed out that United Rentals has 20 locations in Alabama, so they are likely to be reasonably close to most Alabama residents. He suggested we take a look at Equipment & Tools on United Rentals website. He thought most of the equipment we might be interested in would be found in the drop-down menus at the following two tabs:
     o   Earthmoving equipment
     o   Forklifts and Material Handling
    
We clicked on the Earthmoving Equipment tab and found several dozers, skid steers with post hole augers, bucket/front end loaders, and back hoes, huge excavators for building a dam or cleaning a pond, and a 4 wheel drive tractor with front end loader and box blade. A click on the Forklifts and Material Handling tab led to a rough terrain forklift photo with a big load of logs, an assortment of cranes for ?(dropping a prefab bridge into position)?, and a variety of hoists and come-alongs (maybe to drag your stuck truck out of the swamp). Somewhere in the mix we saw a photo of a motor grader, but you'll have to find that one yourself. 

If you wish to take advantage of the 10% discount mentioned by Wes in his interview, print this 2 page file and submit it as proof of membership in AFOA.

Phone: (205) 246-3457
Email: wsmith@ur.com

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Brent Galloway

(26:46)
Hear Conference

Comment

Windrock Park, Tennessee

Brent Galloway is General Manager of The Coal Creek Company located in Oliver Springs, Tennessee. The Coal Creek Company is a publically traded company that was established in 1872 and owns over 72,000 acres in east Tennessee. "We have a coal mining, 400 oil & gas wells, a wind farm, a sustainable timber program, and recreation businesses. Our main recreation business is called Windrock Park."

Windrock Park (find us on Facebook) has two major components:

  1. Off-highway vehicle (OHV) trail system with over 300 miles of trails. There are trails for all vehicle types such as ATVs, Side X Sides (UTVs), Jeeps, 4x4 trucks, dirt bikes, etc. With over 72,000 acres, we are the largest privately owned OHV area in the country.
  2. Windrock Park Campground. Our campground includes 14 cabins, 39 RV sites, and 100+ tent camping sites.

Interesting web pages we found while looking for Windrock stories:

Phone: (865) 435-1251
Email: info@coalcreekcompany.com

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